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Unread 07-06-2014   #1 (permalink)
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Default Nervous cat, will this help?

Hi
I have a female cat who is almost 3 years old. We had her from 8 weeks old and got her from a nice family. She has had a very good life however she is an extemely nervous cat. She's been an indoor cat for about 2-2.5 years as we used to live in a flat and when we moved to a house she's started going outside. She's always been loved and well taken care of. However despite this she has always been very nervous, jumpy at any sound. She has a brillaint bond with me and my husband but will not let anyone else touch her. We can pick her up, carry her, groom, clip nails, brush teeth etc. but if anyone else tries to pet her she will hiss, spitt and have a swing at them with her paws. Vet visits are a nightmare, she bit the vets finger! So i assume this is her personality - very nervous diposition.
So me and my husband were wondering if getting a kitten would help her be more confident?
I read that getting a baby kitten means that adult resident cat is more likely to accept it, plus she is a girl so she may get motherly with the kitten. Also if she is to form a new bond would she become a bit more confident in herself and when she is outdoors? She doesnt like adult cats she meets outside but if we were to get a kitten who she could form a bond with maybe this could help her? Like when getting a kitten for an old cat makes the old cat sping back back to life.

Please let me know what you think? Would this work or is this a terrible idea?
Has anyone had a similar experience?
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Unread 07-06-2014   #2 (permalink)
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I can tell you love your cat very much, but her behavior is not unusual for a cat.

She is spayed, right?

Many cats don't like anyone but the humans they live with. If she doesn't like people petting her, you should not let people do it.

When you have visitors, tell them to leave her alone. Be sure she has a Safe Spot to go to.

If she prefers to hide away when visitors come, let her. If she wants to be out where she can see what's going on, but doesn't want attention, provide her with an elevated perch where she can watch and feel safe, but make people ignore her!

It's not clear to me whether she is an indoor cat or goes outside. I would keep her inside, because I don't believe in outdoor cats.

Most cats don't like the vet, and vets are used to being bitten by them.

About the kitten. First, being a female cat doesn't make her have "maternal" feelings. Those feelings, in cats, are biological in nature and happen when a cat has a litter. Since (hopefully) she is spayed and the kitten is not hers, she is not going to feel "maternal".

Having said that of course it doesn't mean she won't bond with a kitten. She might like having a companion. The thing to remember is, you have to be prepared that this may take quite a lot of work on your part to get her to accept the new one.

You might be lucky and they will like each other right away. On the other hand it can take months for a resident cat to adjust to a new cat, especially a cat used to being an only.

So my main advice is to think deeply and make sure you are going to be committed to keeping the kitten and making it work, no matter how long it takes, before adopting.

I think it's a good idea. I think the introductions should be done very slowly, with a door kept between them for the first week or maybe two weeks, while she gets used to the scent of another cat in the house, , and you exchange scents, (and at least once a day, put her the the kitten's room and let the kitten roam the house).

After a week or so, begin introductions, supervised only, as you see how they react to one another, keeping them separated at all other times still, unless of course there is instant liking on both sides.

Remember that hissing, growling and spitting are normal cat behaviors. It's just a form of communication, so don't be put off or discouraged by that, if it happens.
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Last edited by acerlt; 07-06-2014 at 10:02 AM.
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Unread 07-06-2014   #3 (permalink)
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After re-reading your post I see that she does go outside. I urge you to either cat proof your yard or keep her (and the new one when you get him or her) inside.
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Keep an eye on her, but it's not unusual for cats or for humans! to have reactions to vaccinations. Sometimes one of our cats or another will just sleep all day long after a vet visit, and not eat much. But they bounce back within 24 to 36 hours. Hope that's all it is. After re-reading your post I see that she does go outside. I urge you to either cat proof your yard or keep her inside.
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