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Unread 05-11-2013   #1 (permalink)
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Default Feral Cat Never Domesticated. Need Advice

Hi, I'm a newbie here and I've decided it's high time I seek some advice.

Thirteen years ago, I trapped, spayed and adopted two feral cats, a mother and a daughter. Through the years, the mother became somewhat domesticated and greeted me in the morning, took food from my hand, occasionally allowed me to touch her and knew I was helping her when she was sick.

Her daughter, Lily (thus my name), never domesticated in the slightest. She would never eat while I was in the house. She would, however, lay on my couch, in my living room, while I was in my den or another room, as long as her mom was on the couch with her. Sometimes in the wee hours of the morning, I would hear her talking with her mom and there is a possibility she played with toys, as long as her mom played with her.

At the end of February, her mom got sick with Lymphoma and we lost her. I had hoped, at that time, that Lily might start socializing with one of my other cats, but she doesn't like the male cats and the females don't interact with her either.

Now she hardly comes out from under the bed or couch and I have to feed her under my bed. I give her treats that way too. Instead of progressing, she seems to be regressing.

In all honesty, it breaks my heart...even though the other day she just about spit at me. After 13 years I don't know how to make her understand I would never harm her.

I can't go near her and unless she was deathly ill, I probably couldn't get her to a vet.

Is there anyone who has even a remote possible answer as to how I might go about getting her to trust me?

She's so alone without her mom and I feel helpless. Thank you.
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Unread 05-11-2013   #2 (permalink)
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I'm so sorry for your loss of Lily's mom. Seeing Lily regress must be heart breaking. She is obviously grieving for her loss of her only trusted companion. I have sent you a private message with some other information. Let me know if you need help accessing the message.
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Unread 05-11-2013   #3 (permalink)
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Thanks. I'm there now. Wish me luck.
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Unread 11-09-2015   #4 (permalink)
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Default Can Feral Cats Be Tamed

Can Feral Cats Be Tamed

Feral cats are different from stray cats. Stray cats are usually the product of a person’s irresponsibility. Irresponsibility could be defined in two ways when it comes to strays: dumping a cat to fend for itself and/or neglecting to spay and neuter their cats. Stray cats can be timid, but are often easily tamed. Feral cats are cats that were probably born to wild parents and are wild themselves. Feral cats have had no human interaction and are very difficult to tame.

Because feral cats are difficult to tame, thus making them undesirable indoor pets, there are many rescue organizations that are dedicated to the trapping and spaying and neutering of feral cat colonies. Many times, these organizations trap the cats, have them spayed and neutered and then release them near where they were originally found. Then, they dedicate themselves to providing food to these colonies.

Feral cats are everywhere. You can find feral cats in rural or farm areas, abandoned buildings and even parks and alleyways. You might catch a glimpse of them, but chances are that you would not be able to catch them easily. After all, they have not been around humans so any contact would make them shy away from you. If you have feral cats in your neighbourhood, you may wonder whether these animals can be kept as pets.

Taming a feral cat can be a difficult proposition simply because they are not accustomed to humans. Depending on the level of their interactions with humans, some cats might be classified as semi-feral, total feral or even a converted feral cat. Depending on what your cat is classified dictates your potential success in socializing it. In addition, it takes a lot of time, love and patience to tame these cats.
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Sharing your pain.. My take on this is that each feral is different. I have two in my care. One is an entire male who lives out. He longs to be in but sprays. I need him entire as thi is rural Ireland and ferals are abundant and aggressive. He arrived at my door ( am in an old farmhouse in a remote rural area) and made friends so fast he may well have been dumped. A deeply affectionate cat who tries to get into the coal bag when I am filling the bucket, sits on my lap when I sit out..Always on the doorstep when I come home ( except of late when he was missing days.) The other is a very different matter. A small girl who I took in from a rescue when her kittens were homed. A farmer had been seen trying to bury her newborns and maybe her, alive. When I brought her home, she was so loving and tactile but when the milk went and the hormones wore off she became vicious...Not her fault. I learned never to touch her, not even to hold food out to here as she would claw me terribly. She hid weeks under the bed, lashing out at my ankles so one day when she went to her tray I blocked that off. Six months on and she will come to sniff a finger, and when there is food in the offing she winds round my ankles. I am fine with that; I am here for her not the other way round and i know she is probably many generations feral. Just wait and watch and accept where she is at now. If she is eating etc, fine. Progress with a wild one is slow. I thought mine was more friendly last week and was glad but she was coming into season so that was hormones too..Just wait and watch and feed. She is safe with you. That is the main thing. Bless you for caring...
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Thumbs up Read Your Cat's Body Language - Know Your Pet More

Read Your Cat's Body Language - Know Your Pet More

Meow! That is the sound you hear when you meet your cat walking down the doorway. It will move with his head and tail held high, looking directly at your eyes and emitting a faint sound summoning you to follow wherever it goes. That is your cat? Right? The fluffy little mass, whose behavior seems quite odd at times, and leaves you baffling with a variety of questions.
Have you ever thought that your cat is an aloof creature to you? Then it is because you do not understand it. Your cat is always trying to communicate to you through its gestures and body language, so to know your cat more, you need to know more about the cat’s body language. The sweeping of the tail or rubbing of the cheeks, pricking of the ears or purring under breath - each has a significance of its own. Your cat will often rub its cheeks against you or against the cheeks of another cat. Through this it actually tries to pick up or leave scent markers so that it can again create a future physical contact.
Importance of tail movement
The tail is the most important part of your cat’s body, to indicate a variety of actions and reactions. The tail often denotes its mood and intention. If your cat is sweeping its tail in broad gestures, then it symbolizes annoyance or impatience at your excessive petting. If you continue to cuddle the cat might result in growling softly or giving you a “bat” with its paws. A rapid sweeping of tail back and forth, right from the center shows an extreme agitation in your cat.
If you find your cat turning its body fully sideways and extending its bristled tail upwards, then be sure that your cat is heralding a conflict with the fellow cats. When your cat is busy trapping a prey, you will find it to be more cautious, involved in subtle movements and inflating its tummy while all the time intently aiming at the prey. Often you will find your cat lowering its tail to tuck it between her legs, which show her complete obedience. A raised tail also indicates that your cat wants to be friendly, and a twitching of the tail will confirm its anticipation to be with you after the whole day of outing.
Movement of other body parts
Along with the tail, the cat’s body gestures speak volumes about its mood and behavior. While bent legs denote defending of self, outstretched legs will denote self-confidence and self-assurance. If the cat’s ears are back and the body low, it will impart its shame or remorse; pricked ears will denote interest in the happenings around it. If you find your cat with the head completely lowered then it will show boredom and sneaking subtly with its head lowered on the ground should make you aware of full-fledged assault on the victim ahead.
Knowledge about these kitty-cat behaviors will definitely strengthen the bond between you and your cat.
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